Last edited by Akilkis
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of rise of the Double-crested Cormorant on the Great Lakes found in the catalog.

rise of the Double-crested Cormorant on the Great Lakes

Canada. Environment Canada. Ontario Region.

rise of the Double-crested Cormorant on the Great Lakes

winning the war against contaminants.

by Canada. Environment Canada. Ontario Region.

  • 378 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Environment Canada., Ontario Region in Ottawa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Doble-crested Cormorant -- Great Lakes Region.

  • Edition Notes

    6

    SeriesGreat Lakes fact sheet
    The Physical Object
    Pagination12 p ; 28 cm.
    Number of Pages28
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22114055M

    An academic article detailing specific historic (pre) breeding distribution of Double-crested Cormorants in North America, and a discussion on conservation versus management goals. Environment Canada’s fact sheet: The Rise of the Double-crested Cormorant on the Great Lakes: Winning the War Against Contaminants. During the breeding season, the Double-crested Cormorants eyes and mouth turn a bright blue-teal color. Andrew Radomski. Characteristics. During the high of the breeding season, a cormorant's teal-blue eyes, bright yellow throat pouch, and tufts of feathers just above the eyes (for which the bird is named) cause this bird to stand out among the rest.

      The Double-crested cormorant maintains many colonies throughout the Great Lakes, with the highest numbers of birds being present on Lakes Huron and Ontario. This species is a common to abundant migrant, but is only rarely seen in winter (Thomas, ).   A few decades ago, the migratory bird was nearly wiped out, but the population has since rebounded - so much so that the bird has become a pain in the backside for some anglers and cottagers. Ontario Hubs field producer Jeyan Jeganathan examines the history of the double-crested cormorant in the Great Lakes region.

      The double-crested cormorant is a long-lived, colonial-nesting waterbird native to North America. It is one of 38 species of cormorants worldwide and one of six species in North America. The double-crested cormorant is usually found in flocks throughout North America, including along the coast and inland on lakes, rivers, and other water bodies. According to Wires, such operations are now occurring at 48 of the documented colonies on the Great Lakes. (On Lake Superior, where cormorant numbers are .


Share this book
You might also like
Matter and Energy, Unit Transparency Book

Matter and Energy, Unit Transparency Book

Absolute Confusion

Absolute Confusion

The collected writings of Thomas De Quincey

The collected writings of Thomas De Quincey

Weaver of dreams

Weaver of dreams

modern Jacob

modern Jacob

Investment analysis and portfolio management

Investment analysis and portfolio management

Environmental enrichment for nonhuman primates resource guide

Environmental enrichment for nonhuman primates resource guide

The romance of Isabel, Lady Burton

The romance of Isabel, Lady Burton

Home Tonight

Home Tonight

Bibliography of the Japanese empire 1906-1926

Bibliography of the Japanese empire 1906-1926

Visa requirements of foreign governments

Visa requirements of foreign governments

Sunday school and band of hope speaker.

Sunday school and band of hope speaker.

reign of the House of Rothschild

reign of the House of Rothschild

Act of Council, explanatory of the test

Act of Council, explanatory of the test

Rise of the Double-crested Cormorant on the Great Lakes by Canada. Environment Canada. Ontario Region. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a member of the cormorant family of habitat is near rivers and lakes as well as in coastal areas, and is widely distributed across North America, from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska down to Florida and ing 70–90 cm (28–35 in) in length, it is an all-black bird which gains a small double crest of black Class: Aves.

breeding birds remaining or breeding successfully. The devastation of the Great Lakes cormorant population was a grim example of the declining health of the Great Lakes ecosystem. A Population Resurgence Today, the Great Lakes population of double-crested cormorants is. The Rise of Double-Crested Cormorants Brian S.

Dorr The double-crested cormorant is a prehistoric-looking, matte-black bird with yellow-orange facial skin and a blue eye ring. Commonly found in fresh and salt water across North In the Great Lakes region alone,Author: Brian S Dorr, David G Fielder. The rise of the double-crested cormorant on the Great Lakes: winning the war against contaminants.

Along the shorelines of northeastern North America, burly Great Cormorants mix in with slimmer, more abundant Double-crested Cormorants. These large-billed, blocky-headed cormorants have a white throat patch and in breeding season a white patch on the thigh. They feed mostly on bottom-dwelling fish captured during dives.

Like other cormorants their plumage has limited. In The Double-Crested Cormorant, Dennis Wild brings together the biological, social, legal, and international aspects of the cormorant's world to give a complete and balanced view of one of the Great Lakes' and perhaps North America's most misunderstood species.

In addition to taking a detailed look at the complex natural history of the 5/5(2). In The Double-Crested Cormorant, Dennis Wild brings together the biological, social, legal, and international aspects of the cormorant's world to give a complete and balanced view of one of the Great Lakes' and perhaps North America's most misunderstood species.

In addition to taking a detailed look at the complex natural history of the. The double-crested cormorant is a medium to large seabird, with a body length of approximately 30 inches and a wingspan of 45 inches.

From far away, adult birds appear mostly black, but a close-up look reveals several colorful details, including a yellow-orange "throat" patch, a blue gullet, and striking green emerald-like eyes. The gangly Double-crested Cormorant is a prehistoric-looking, matte-black fishing bird with yellow-orange facial skin.

Though they look like a combination of a goose and a loon, they are relatives of frigatebirds and boobies and are a common sight around fresh and salt water across North America—perhaps attracting the most attention when they stand on docks, rocky.

The double-crested cormorant is a species that is even more widespread in winter. The largest number of colonies in southern California of double-crested cormorants is found on islands of Channel Islands National Park with nesting occurring on Santa Barbara, Anacapa, and San Miguel islands, with an occasional colony on Santa Cruz Island.

Those who’ve visited the Door County shoreline in recent years may have noticed an increased number of a distinctive bird – the cormorant. Current studies are slowly revealing the impact these birds have on the Great Lakes ecosystem. A relative of the pelican, Double-crested Cormorants have a four-foot wingspan and an orange throat pouch that [ ].

The great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), known as the black shag in New Zealand and formerly also known as the great black cormorant across the Northern Hemisphere, the black cormorant in Australia, and the large cormorant in India, is a widespread member of the cormorant family of seabirds.

The genus name is Latinised Ancient Greek, from φαλακρός (phalakros, Family: Phalacrocoracidae. General Comments: Hardly any bird in North Carolina has increased in recent decades as dramatically as has the Double-crested Cormorant.

Though it has been a common coastal bird for many decades, it has started to become very common at many of the reservoirs inland, where it used to be a rare bird and a good find. North American Breeding Distribution and Relative Abundance: The Double-crested Cormorant can be found along both coastlines during the breeding season as well as at inland breeding sites in the central Canadian provinces and the north-central region of the United States, from Montana east through the Great Lakes.

Rise of Double-Crested Cormorants. Page 1 of 2 [ 23 posts ] Go to page 1, 2 Next: Previous topic The composition of a double-crested cormorant’s diet can vary considerably from site to site and throughout the year.

It does need groups to do the talking in all the states around the great lakes at the same time,so the states can work. Double-crested Cormorant: Medium cormorant with iridescent black body and orange throat pouch.

Western birds have white feather tufts over each eye in early summer. Pale bill is long and hooked. Black legs and feet. Feeds on fish, amphibians and crustaceans.

Strong direct flight, soars on thermals. example, the Double-crested Cormorant population in the Great Lakes is now estimat- ed at approximat pairs in an area ofkrn. (Hatch ), or a densicy of one bird for every km2. The latest esti- mates for the Xorth American breeding pop- ulation arepairs (Hatch ) in anFile Size: KB.

This dark, long-bodied diving bird floats low in the water with its thin neck and bill raised; perches upright near water with wings half-spread to dry. The Double-crested (which rarely looks noticeably crested in the field) is the most generally distributed cormorant in North America, and the only one likely to be seen inland in most areas.

Found throughout the American tropics, this lanky diving bird is common in some areas near the Mexican border, and may be gradually extending its range north. Similar to the Double-crested Cormorant but a little smaller, and may be found with it, especially inland or in winter.

Formerly called Olivaceous Cormorant. DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS - are they a had spread eastward colonizing all of the Great Lakes, including Lake Ontario.

By the early s, The double-crested cormorant breed in the Great-Lake St. Lawrence region between April and late June. The species is a colonial nester usually nesting.

double-crested cormorant (DCCO) has made an impressive comeback in the Great Lakes (Scharf and ShugartLudwigWeseloh et al. ) and now numbers as many as 50, in Michigan waters alone (Ludwig and Summer ). From about throughcormorants were almost extirpated from the Great Lakes due to.

The tragic history of the cormorant’s relations with humans and the implications for today’s wildlife management policy The double-crested cormorant, found only in North America, is an iridescent black waterbird superbly adapted to catch fish. It belongs to a family of birds vilified since biblical times and persecuted around the world.The double-crested cormorant is an interesting yet controversial bird.

T his bulletinis a comprehensive guide to the issues surrounding the double-crested cormorant (Phalacroco-rax auritus), a species that has gener-ated a tremendous amount of interest and controversy in recent years. The information presented is intended to help anglers, fish.